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Learning PostgreSQL at the Big Nerd Ranch
"The training was structured to teach as much about PostgreSQL administration as possible in five days. It even says so on my diploma. There is room for 12 in the class, but only 11 participated in this class. The organizers provided two manuals so we could follow their lesson plans and walk through the related exercises. On the last day of the class, we received a CD with the course materials, slides, documentation and even some photos we had taken during the week. Thanks to the generous (free) licensing of PostgreSQL, the lessons often included the official documentation for commands relevant to that lesson. This was their first time training for PostgreSQL 8.0, which still is in beta, so there were occasional minor mistakes in slides and manuals."
Story

( Permalink: Learning PostgreSQL at the Big Nerd Ranch      Submitted by Noel Tue Oct 19, 2004 )

Linux Around The World
"Probably the most interesting thing I saw come out of India in the past week is the 'Confessions of a recent Linux convert' by Ila Patnaik, who named her new system after her son. She switched for very practical reasons, and it's definitely an article that a few people could afford reading. Maybe she'll join Linux India. Of course, if you head over to Groups of Linux Users Everywhere, India, you'll see plenty of LUGs. And more coming."
Story

( Permalink: Linux Around The World      Submitted by Noel Tue Oct 19, 2004 )

File system snapshots with LVM
"My employer uses mail server software called CommunigatePro written by Stalker Software. CGatePro runs on many, many operating systems and is very configurable. The software stores its data at /var/CommuniGate by default and that's the only directory you ever have to backup. The goal is to get a Mail server that will never be taken offline for nightly backups (as our old system used to). We found Linux, XFS, LVM, and snapshots to be perfect for this situation"
Story

( Permalink: File system snapshots with LVM      Submitted by Noel Tue Oct 19, 2004 )

Mac OS X Power Hound Helpful Hints
"Mac OS X gives you lots of freedom in lots of areas, but it's fairly stern about one: you're not allowed to rename any of the key system folders--Applications, Library, and so on--and you really shouldn't rename the pre-installed folders inside of your Home folder (like Movies, Pictures, Documents, and Music). Although OS X will let you change Music to My Music Collection, bad digital things may happen when your programs go looking for folder names that no longer exist--iTunes will no longer be able to find its library unless you tell it the new location. Other programs may not be so accommodating and will just fail when they can't find the Music directory."
Story

( Permalink: Mac OS X Power Hound Helpful Hints      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 18, 2004 )

The Legacy of DES
"By the mid-1990s, it became widely believed that the NSA was able to break DES by trying every possible key. This ability was demonstrated in 1998, when a $220,000 machine was built that could brute-force a DES key in a few days. In 1985, the academic community proposed a DES variant with the same mathematics but a longer key, called triple-DES. This variant had been used in more secure applications in place of DES for years, but it was time for a new standard. In 1997, NIST solicited an algorithm to replace DES."
Story

( Permalink: The Legacy of DES      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 18, 2004 )

Windows Gaming under Linux with WineX
"Simply said, WineX creates an environment for Windows games to run under Linux and is developed by transgaming.com. More technically said, WineX is an alternative implementation of Microsoft's Win32 Application Programming Interfaces (API) which form the basis to run all Windows software. The Win32 APIs themselves are extremely broad, covering thousands of functions like file and disk management, etc."
Story

( Permalink: Windows Gaming under Linux with WineX      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 18, 2004 )

Using DPMS to reduce your power bill
DPMS is used to communicate between your monitor and computer to make your computer turn off your monitor when you have been neglecting it for a given period of time. Recently I have been surprised to find out how many people don't seem to have DPMS setup on their Linux Desktops and it seems to be partially just cause they don't know how. So lets fix that. DPMS in X Tutorial
Story

( Permalink: Using DPMS to reduce your power bill      Submitted by xiando Mon Oct 18, 2004 )

PC Hacks for Linux
"Linux has advanced disk management and repair tools too. Of note is the SystemRescueCD from http://www.sysresccd.com. SystemRescueCD is offered as an ISO file that can be written to a CD-R to make a bootable rescue CD. The packages includes several essential tools for fixing Linux boot-up problems, including:"
Story

( Permalink: PC Hacks for Linux      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 18, 2004 )

Introduction to Rubyx Linux
"R is for Ruby: rubyx is one large script written in Ruby (programming language comparable to Python). This script manages all aspects of running the system: installation, configuration, booting, managing services, adding and updating software, and even creating isos. The details of installation for all packages - Rubyx ebuilds, if you like - are small Ruby scripts as well."
Story

( Permalink: Introduction to Rubyx Linux      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 18, 2004 )

How to use passwords securely
Passwords have become, without doubt, users’ ID cards in the Internet. Thanks to passwords, you can prove who you are and unauthorized access can be blocked. However, by the same token, should a malicious user steal or discover this data, they can take on your digital identity. story

( Permalink: How to use passwords securely      Submitted by Scott Mon Oct 18, 2004 )

60GB iPod to pack photo-viewing features
"After three years of being synonymous with "digital music player," Apple's iPod will widen its horizons and gain photo-viewing capabilities within the next 30 to 60 days, highly reliable sources tell Think Secret. The new iPod, which will sit at the top of Apple's fourth-generation line-up, will pack Toshiba's new 60GB 1.8-inch hard drive, a 2-inch color liquid crystal display, iPhoto synchronization, audio/video-out capabilities, and will sell for $499. "
Story

( Permalink: 60GB iPod to pack photo-viewing features      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 16, 2004 )

A font primer for Linux
"As recently as two years ago, the average deployed Linux system had inconsistent font support -- some applications were not able to access all the installed fonts on the system, some applications were incapable of anti-aliasing, and a user trying to sort it out quickly became mired in an alphabet soup of confusingly-similar terms: TrueType, OpenType, FreeType, Type 1, et cetera."
Story

( Permalink: A font primer for Linux      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 16, 2004 )

Pete Gordon on Portable Usability Labs
"Look at Linux, MySQL, PHP, Perl, and so much more (I personally love Mac OS X Desktop Manager--Richard Wareham you are amazing!) these are great examples of where developers develop for themselves, and the community at large benefits amazingly. The other side is when developers develop for themselves and it only meets a small portion of the user needs; or even worse the code (solution or whatever you want to call the product) goes in the wrong direction from meeting the primary users needs in favor of the few."
Story

( Permalink: Pete Gordon on Portable Usability Labs      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 16, 2004 )

Broadband installation for a custom Linux system
"A lot of tools for bio-informaticians are available for Linux. People used to Windows are often intimidated by the complexity of Linux and therefore don't use these free and great tools. This tutorial describes a step-by-step guide to do a netinstall of Debian GNU/ Linux next to Windows for a dual boot system. Please note that if you follow these steps you'll need a broadband internet connection. To install Linux next to Windows you can't just insert a CD, follow a wizard and drink a cup of coffee while waiting (well, the last thing you can do as a matter of fact). You need to divide your hard drive in sections called partitions."
Story

( Permalink: Broadband installation for a custom Linux system      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 16, 2004 )

Should you do Ubuntu?
"On my system, installing the bootloader caused a few problems. I have one SATA and one IDE hard drive. I use the SATA disk as my primary, and I wanted the bootloader code to be installed onto its master boot record. Ubuntu had different ideas, though. No matter what I tried, it simply refused to install onto the SATA drive. Every time, it would write the bootloader code onto the IDE drive. I Googled and found that others with similar configurations have had the same problem. I finally yanked the IDE drive out of my system, after which Ubuntu finally installed onto the SATA disk. I have installed Mandrakelinux 10.0, SUSE 9.1, Slackware 10, and Fedora Core 2 on exactly the same system without ever having this problem; I don't see why Ubuntu should not work as seamlessly as these distros."
Story

( Permalink: Should you do Ubuntu?      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 16, 2004 )

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