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Ubuntu 4.10, The Warty Warthog
"Ubuntu is at the first release and is working nice. It starts from a great base, Debian, and the efforts are clearly oriented to provide an easy-to-use desktop system. But, although I didn't mention it in this article, it does not miss anything to work perfectly on servers. I concentrated only on the Desktop environment cause that's what i was looking for. There's room for improvement and the six-months scheduled releases are just a dream for a PowerPC distribution at the moment. Give it a try and see if it does for you. "
Story

( Permalink: Ubuntu 4.10, The Warty Warthog      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 25, 2004 )

HOWTO Program in Qt using Qt Designer
"Here are some simple steps to create a 'Hello, World!' application in Qt using Qt Designer. Aim is to create a Window with a push button on it and when clicking on the push button, "Hello, World!" will be shown on the terminal window. All these steps are tested on a Fedora Core 2 machine with Qt 3.3.2 and KDE 3.2"
Story

( Permalink: HOWTO Program in Qt using Qt Designer      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 25, 2004 )

Secure Communication with Stunnel
"One of Stunnel's most common uses is encrypting communications between POP or IMAP mail servers and e-mail clients. Both of these protocols require users to authenticate themselves with a username and a password. In the majority of cases, these usernames and passwords are the same ones as they would use for logging into the machine locally or remotely via SSH. Without using Stunnel to encrypt this data, anyone intercepting the transmission could now log into your server and gain elevated privileges much easier than a local exploit would require."
Story

( Permalink: Secure Communication with Stunnel      Submitted by Noel Mon Oct 25, 2004 )

Making Cocoa-Java Apps Scriptable
"This article will take you through a number of the most common operations undertaken when implementing an AppleScript interface in a Cocoa-Java based application. The main aim is to show you that it works just as you would expect it to. If you encounter a problem, at least you can be happy in the knowledge that it's of your own making!"
Story

( Permalink: Making Cocoa-Java Apps Scriptable      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 23, 2004 )

Critical Server Needs and the Linux Kernel
"This article provides some examples of features and mechanisms needed in the Linux kernel for server nodes operating in mission-critical environments, such as telecom, where reliability, performance, availability and security are extremely important. Here, we discuss four such features: a cluster communication protocol, support for multiple-FIB, a module to verify digital signatures of binaries at run time and an efficient low-level asynchronous event mechanism. For some of these example features, open-source projects already exist to provide their implementations. For other features, there currently is no open-source project that can implement them. For each of our four examples features, we discuss the feature, its importance, the advantages it provides, its implementation when available and the status of its integration with the Linux kernel."
Story

( Permalink: Critical Server Needs and the Linux Kernel      Submitted by Noel Sat Oct 23, 2004 )

Optimize Perl
Perl is an incredibly flexible language, but its ease of use can lead to some sloppy and lazy programming habits. We're all guilty of them, but there are some quick steps you can take to improve the performance of your Perl applications. This article looks at the key areas of optimization, which solutions work and which don't, and how to continue to build and extend your applications with optimization and speed in mind.

( Permalink: Optimize Perl      Submitted by Anonymous Sat Oct 23, 2004 )

The dual 2.5-GHz Power Mac G5
"Thanks to Apple Computer's review program, I've been able to use one of the new Power Macs for the past three weeks or so, and I can tell you that if you need unadulterated processing power, the dual 2.5 is worth the wait. No, it's not quite the 3.0-GHz G5 Steve Jobs optimistically promised in 2003. But it offers more than enough warp-factor power for just about anything this side of genomic sequencing."
Story

( Permalink: The dual 2.5-GHz Power Mac G5      Submitted by Noel Fri Oct 22, 2004 )

IPod Users Go Into the Closet†
"As the iPod moves fast into the mainstream (Susquehanna Financial Group predicts Apple and Hewlett-Packard will sell 1 million iPods a month this holiday season), more and more users are going back into the closet. "I started to feel like a walking iPod ad," said one New Yorker, who preferred to remain anonymous, in print and in person. "I actually dug out an old pair of black headphones to use with mine."
Story

( Permalink: IPod Users Go Into the Closet†      Submitted by Noel Fri Oct 22, 2004 )

Game Cube Linux kernel recompile
"Linux on these consoles is just interesting, a possibility to expand the use of something thought just as a gaming platform but structured with good hardware that allows you to do much more. A multimedia box, nothing revolutionary, but an add-on to the gaming strategy. Sony is officially selling a Linux kit for its PS2 and several distributions are known to run on the Microsoft Xbox (have you ever thought of a Xbox cluster?)."
Story

( Permalink: Game Cube Linux kernel recompile      Submitted by Noel Fri Oct 22, 2004 )

The State of the Demon Address
"If you're looking for a software solution in the Berkeley Software Distribution family, you won't be disappointed. All four major projects are continually updated and developed whether you need a general workstation solution, network security, hardware development, or a desktop operating system. The BSD world has never looked brighter than now and each project is geared for major upgrades in the near future, guaranteeing a continuity of utility in the years to come."
Story

( Permalink: The State of the Demon Address      Submitted by Noel Fri Oct 22, 2004 )

Revision Control with Arch: Introduction to Arch
"Whether you're moving up from CVS or getting serious about a revision control system, here's a powerful tool that will keep records of changes and keep your projects under control. Arch quickly is becoming one of the most powerful tools in the free software developer's collection. This is the first in a series of three articles that teaches basic use of Arch for distributed development, to manage shared archives and script automated systems around Arch projects."
Story

( Permalink: Revision Control with Arch: Introduction to Arch      Submitted by Noel Fri Oct 22, 2004 )

PHP 5's new look
"The greatest change in PHP 5 comes with a complete redesign of its object model, and with it, a tighter integration to object-oriented (OO) paradigms. Previous versions' usage of objects had one major drawback: Objects were not tightly aligned with the behavioural patterns observed in other object languages like Java or C++. While PHP offered a simpler approach, the disparity created a considerable chasm for those wanting to use PHP in a truly object-oriented manner -- in the sense of what the industry perceives as object-oriented."
Story

( Permalink: PHP 5's new look      Submitted by Noel Fri Oct 22, 2004 )

Doing the GNUstep two-step
"The GNUstep environment itself is a useful tool, allowing you to create applications that are easily portable to other systems. GNUstep includes a large library of reusable code to help you build your application as quickly and painlessly as possible. I am using the GNUstep environment right now to create a 2D role-playing game. While it is only in pre-alpha stages, using the GNUstep environment has helped me see where I might have made the mistake of using a not so easily portable piece of code or library."
Story

( Permalink: Doing the GNUstep two-step      Submitted by Noel Fri Oct 22, 2004 )

High Performance MySQL
"The book is broken out into ten chapters, beginning with a chapter on the basics of MySQL as seen from someone with some level of MySQL experience. (And since I am someone with some level of MySQL knowledge, this chapter didn't seem to be too painful of a read.) That statement begs for a further explanation. I find it painful to read books that claim to have advanced topics but find it necessary to spend (or waste) time by giving yet another explanation of how to type ./configure; make; make install in the beginning chapter. In this regard, I find High Performance MySQL to be quite good at providing the appropriate level of explanation for the audience."
Story

( Permalink: High Performance MySQL      Submitted by Noel Fri Oct 22, 2004 )

Sizing up the Super Heavyweights
"Although moderate increases in commercial and throughput oriented performance was expected from the addition of SMT to POWER5, greatly improved latency and bandwidth in its cache and memory system not only amplified the increase in throughput but also raised single thread performance far above that of the POWER4+ and allowed it to take the lead in technical computing benchmarks like SPECfp2000 which the Madison I2 had previously held unchallenged. The POWER5ís margin of leadership can be expected to increase in the near future, as larger CPU count systems are gradually introduced."
Story

( Permalink: Sizing up the Super Heavyweights      Submitted by Noel Thu Oct 21, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Kernel DoS Vulnerability
(Wed Jun 30, 2004)

What To Do When Things Go Wrong
(Wed Jun 30, 2004)

Security: The root of the problem
(Wed Jun 30, 2004)

Five Performance Tools for Linux on PowerPC
(Wed Jun 30, 2004)

Automating Builds on Linux
(Wed Jun 30, 2004)

Hidden costs of offshoring
(Wed Jun 30, 2004)

Getting Comcast Email on Home Linux Box
(Tue Jun 29, 2004)

The RULE Mini Kde page
(Tue Jun 29, 2004)

Existing Applications can be Enabled for Grid
(Tue Jun 29, 2004)

Pronunciation of Software Names
(Tue Jun 29, 2004)

RealNetworks shows some love to Linux
(Tue Jun 29, 2004)

Open Source Innovation within the DoD
(Tue Jun 29, 2004)

Handy wireless networking with Knoppix Linux
(Mon Jun 28, 2004)

What's New, KDE 3.3 Preview
(Mon Jun 28, 2004)

How To Write Unmaintainable Code
(Mon Jun 28, 2004)

Red Hat Desktop Review
(Mon Jun 28, 2004)

Building a Linux firewall and router
(Mon Jun 28, 2004)

Creating a cron GUI Interface with Ruby/Tk
(Mon Jun 28, 2004)

Stupid cat tricks that work.
(Sun Jun 27, 2004)

Python applied to the Natural Language
(Sun Jun 27, 2004)

Moving on to Fedora Core 2 from Fedora Core 1
(Sun Jun 27, 2004)

Programming with bash
(Sun Jun 27, 2004)

Postfix: The Definitive Guide
(Sun Jun 27, 2004)

Xandros Desktop OS 2.0
(Sun Jun 27, 2004)

How to use cryptography in computer security
(Sat Jun 26, 2004)

SuSE Linux 9.1 Review
(Sat Jun 26, 2004)

Scanning for viruses with Knoppix
(Sat Jun 26, 2004)

Semi-Pro Linux-Based Recording
(Sat Jun 26, 2004)

Review: PlanMaker for Linux
(Sat Jun 26, 2004)

Interview with Gavriel State (Transgaming)
(Sat Jun 26, 2004)

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