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Interview with Firefox developer Blake Ross
"Version 1.0 was released today after extensive public testing. Even the most diehard Safari users should be keenly interested in the launch of Firefox. Not only does it share roots with Safari, through Chimera's developer David Hyatt, who now works on Apple's Safari, but Firefox is a serious contender to break up the Microsoft Internet Explorer stranglehold. A variety of browers will mean developers will cater to browsers other than Microsoft's, and will go a long way to improving security issues on the Web."
Story

( Permalink: Interview with Firefox developer Blake Ross      Submitted by Noel Thu Nov 11, 2004 )

Using DSL with Linux
"Mark Rais offers DesktopLinux.com readers a tutorial on setting up broadband connectivity using DSL on Linux-based systems. Rais, author of the just-released Linux For the Rest of Us, gives KDE and Gnome users tips to get their systems up-and-running step by step. His website offers a host of great tutorials and instructions on using Linux."
Story

( Permalink: Using DSL with Linux      Submitted by Noel Thu Nov 11, 2004 )

 Run (Damn Small) Linux on Windows
"There are a couple of ways you can try Linux before installing it on your hard drive. One way is to use a live cd, another way is to run it on Windows. Damn Small Linux has a version designed to run directly from Windows. To run (Damn Small) Linux on Windows follow the steps below:"
Story

( Permalink:  Run (Damn Small) Linux on Windows      Submitted by Noel Thu Nov 11, 2004 )

Alan Nugent: Insight from Novell's CTO
"In this interview by Preston St. Pierre, Alan Nugent, Novell's CTO, speaks on behalf of Novell on their Linux strategy. Innovation is on the way at Novell, with a next-generation desktop in the plans. Internally, the Linux migration is on schedule, and the staff are wholly in favor of moving away from Windows. "
Story

( Permalink: Alan Nugent: Insight from Novell's CTO      Submitted by Noel Thu Nov 11, 2004 )

Beat Spam Using hashcash
If they want to send spam, make them pay a price. Built on the widely available SHA-1 algorithm, hashcash is a clever system that requires a parameterizable amount of work on the part of a requester while staying "cheap" for an evaluator to check. In other words, the sender has to do real work to put something into your inbox. You can certainly use hashcash in preventing spam, but it has other applications as well, including keeping spam off of Wikis and speeding the work of distributed parallel applications.

( Permalink: Beat Spam Using hashcash      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Nov 11, 2004 )

Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic
"A total of 126 Industry awards, 48 of which are for 'Game of the Year' makes Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (KotOR) a game to take notice of. Featuring a unique decision-making system combined with excellent story telling and a truly beautiful score, KotOR is a 3D role-playing game with behindview and a rotating camera that allows a player, especially a fan of the Star Wars universe, to fully immerse themselves into their character and play like the galaxy's fate is in their hands. "
Story

( Permalink: Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 10, 2004 )

What's New in Fedora Core 3 SE Linux
"Security Enhanced Linux (SE Linux) now is the default configuration for an installation of Fedora Core 3 (FC3). When you install FC3, you have the option of turning off SE Linux. Alternatively, you can turn it off manually after it has been installed. In FC2, SE Linux was not installed by default but was an option offered during the installation process, where you had to supply selinux as a parameter to the boot loader."
Story

( Permalink: What's New in Fedora Core 3 SE Linux      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 10, 2004 )

Making Sense of startup
"It is possible to view the initial, random messages using the dmesg command. A quick read of the dmesg manpage states that dmesg is a utility that can "print or control the kernel ring buffer". Among other things, the kernel ring buffer is the place where boot messages are logged. The following command line displays the ring buffer's current contents; notice the piping to less, which displays the messages one screen at a time:"
Story

( Permalink: Making Sense of startup      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 10, 2004 )

White Box fills niche between Fedora and RHEL
"Software installation is the familiar Anaconda-based install. White Box has removed all Red Hat branding and replaced it with its own. Aside from that, it is exactly the same as any RH/Fedora install. I chose the server installation, and installed it without any problems in a little over 20 minutes. After installing, the first thing I did was run up2date. White Box has used yum from Fedora and modified the up2date agent to work seamlessly with it. In my case, it connected to the White Box servers and told me that 121 updates were available. I downloaded all of them. Samba and OpenSSL were two essentials that needed to be updated, and WBEL is very much up-to-date with both. White Box has done a good job with the updates, and this in itself is a killer feature for those looking to upgrade from earlier versions of Red Hat."
Story

( Permalink: White Box fills niche between Fedora and RHEL      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 10, 2004 )

Keep an Eye on Your Linux Systems with Netstat
"Two of the fundamental aspects of Linux system security and troubleshooting are knowing what services are running, and what connections and services are available. We're all familiar with ps for viewing active services. netstat goes a couple of steps further, and displays all available connections, services, and their status. It shows one type of service that ps does not: services run from inetd or xinetd, because inetd/xinetd start them up on demand. "
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( Permalink: Keep an Eye on Your Linux Systems with Netstat      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 10, 2004 )

The men behind ettercapNG
"In 2001 two Italians released the first beta version of ettercap, a network protocol analyzer. This summer they released ettercapNG, which was completely rewritten from scratch with better, modular code, making it easier to add new features and write and submit patches. Ettercap is now covered in most security books. It's number 9 in the Top 75 Security Tools list of the Nmap Hackers mailing list. NewsForge recently caught up with its authors, Alberto Ornaghi (a.k.a. ALoR) and Marco Valleri (a.k.a. NaGA). Each is 26 years old, and they work as security consultants for two different company in Milan."
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( Permalink: The men behind ettercapNG      Submitted by Noel Wed Nov 10, 2004 )

Playing God: BiblePlayer for iPod catches on
"The brainchild of Los Angeles-based programmer Pablo Mendigochea, BiblePlayer offers three different text versions of the Bible that can be read on the iPod's screen using the device's "Notes" function. The company also markets a deluxe version of the product, which features MP3 audio readings of the Bible on CD-ROM for $29. Either product can be used with any third- or fourth-generation iPod."
Story

( Permalink: Playing God: BiblePlayer for iPod catches on      Submitted by Noel Tue Nov 9, 2004 )

Delicious Library
"Let's start with the actual product name. It's not "MacLibrary X" or anything similarly predictable. The application is called Delicious Library. That sounds...odd. On the other hand, it's also slightly intriguing, maybe even fun. But come on, it's a glorified list of books, movies, music, and games. Surely anyone who's even interested in such a thing already has a text file or Excel spreadsheet or (for the truly industrious) FileMaker database that works just fine, thank you, for tracking media libraries. Heck, I recall videophiles in the heyday of the VCR proudly displaying tightly-printed sheets of paper containing alphabetized lists of their vast VHS collections. Putting this stuff on the computer seems like using a sledgehammer to kill an ant."
Story

( Permalink: Delicious Library      Submitted by Noel Tue Nov 9, 2004 )

Installation And Securing VoIP With Linux
Successful businesses usually have the same goal, minimize costs to maximize profits. Today with the plethora of open source solutions, a small business can present a high tech image and still keep a lid on the expenses. Early last winter, we had the opportunity to present a proposal for a financial institution to add two new remote offices. The requirement was to find a low cost solution for both the voice and data connections between all bank branches and provide a seamless integrated phone system with branch to branch dialing by extension, voice mail and conference calling....
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( Permalink: Installation And Securing VoIP With Linux      Submitted by josh Tue Nov 9, 2004 )

Emacs Mode for GDB
"For some tasks, however, it is useful have a graphical user interface (GUI). Graphical front ends are available for GDB, including Insight, but they require a separate editor. Until now, Emacs used a mode that originally was written by Eric Raymond in 1992. This comprised of the GUD buffer, where GDB commands were entered as though on the command line, and the source buffer, where a arrow string ("=>") pointed to the current line of program execution. In this article, I describe a new mode, which I call GDB-UI, that is a part of the next release of Emacs (21.4) and offers the GUI features of many modern debuggers. The advantage of this mode over the other debuggers is the powerful features of Emacs are available for tasks such as editing and searching to provide a truly integrated development environment."
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( Permalink: Emacs Mode for GDB      Submitted by Noel Tue Nov 9, 2004 )

Featured Articles:
Unix and Linux Podcasting Guide

Expect and SSH

The Linux Enterprise Cluster

Book Review: Podcasting: Do-It-Yourself Guide

Remote Backups With Rsync

Weakness and Security

Essential CVS

Spring Into Technical Writing

Other News:
Biodiesel Resources

Older News

Doom 3 has gone gold
(Mon Jul 19, 2004)

Stratagus: Open Source Strategy Games
(Mon Jul 19, 2004)

Introducing Screen
(Mon Jul 19, 2004)

Device-Driver Trouble
(Mon Jul 19, 2004)

Mobile AirDesk
(Mon Jul 19, 2004)

A Look at dd_rescue
(Mon Jul 19, 2004)

When Penguins Roar
(Sun Jul 18, 2004)

Customizing GNOME
(Sun Jul 18, 2004)

An introduction to Softirqs
(Sun Jul 18, 2004)

This Linux Box Is too Loud!
(Sun Jul 18, 2004)

A minimal Qt library
(Sun Jul 18, 2004)

Back Up My Linux
(Sun Jul 18, 2004)

PlanMaker for GNU/Linux
(Sat Jul 17, 2004)

Spinlocks as locking construct in SMP systems
(Sat Jul 17, 2004)

IBM ThinkPad T41
(Sat Jul 17, 2004)

Running free with Linux wireless
(Sat Jul 17, 2004)

Jython for Python and Java developers
(Sat Jul 17, 2004)

Is Microsoft Waging a Secret War of Linux Slander
(Sat Jul 17, 2004)

The art of UNIX programming
(Fri Jul 16, 2004)

Slackware 10: First Impressions
(Fri Jul 16, 2004)

802.11 Wireless LAN Fundamentals
(Fri Jul 16, 2004)

The Gift Economy and Free Software
(Fri Jul 16, 2004)

Scripting Languages
(Fri Jul 16, 2004)

A novel authentication method for Apache
(Fri Jul 16, 2004)

At the Sounding Edge: LilyPond
(Fri Jul 16, 2004)

SysAdmin to SysAdmin: Approaching Perl
(Thu Jul 15, 2004)

Dariusz Arciszewski and David Vignoni
(Thu Jul 15, 2004)

Inter-Process Communication
(Thu Jul 15, 2004)

Safely delete Linux files with libtrash
(Wed Jul 14, 2004)

InstallShield X and Linux
(Wed Jul 14, 2004)

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