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Advanced UNIX Programming, Second Edition
"The book begins with an introduction to UNIX and its variants, including Linux and FreeBSD. Subsequently, the book deals with I/O--file I/O and, perhaps less common, terminal I/O--processes and threads. A large portion of the book is devoted to interprocess communication (IPC). Coverage is given to pipes, named pipes (FIFOs), shared memory and sockets, all of which are accompanied by many code examples. Also explained are the two sets of system calls used for messages, semaphores and shared memory--System V IPC, the older system, and POSIX IPC, the newer one. In addition to describing each system, the author explains the advantages and disadvantages of using each."
Story

( Permalink: Advanced UNIX Programming, Second Edition      Submitted by Noel Thu Jan 13, 2005 )

Automating the Login Script
"In a perfect world, you could spend a few weeks creating a system and the result would be a system that never required manual maintenance or modifications. Whether this ideal will ever be achieved is debatable, but it definitely won't happen in the near future. In the meantime, we still have to do things manually, even if only once in a while. When I must do things manually, I'm not usually happy about it. In fact, it usually means that there has been an emergency, so other people aren't happy about it either. In times like this, it is nice to have a consistent and efficient user interface on every machine."
Story

( Permalink: Automating the Login Script      Submitted by Noel Thu Jan 13, 2005 )

Dissecting shared libraries
Shared libraries use version numbers to allow for upgrades to the libraries used by applications while preserving compatibility for older applications. This article reviews what's really going on under the book jacket and why there are so many symbolic links in /usr/lib on a normal Linux system.

( Permalink: Dissecting shared libraries      Submitted by Anonymous Thu Jan 13, 2005 )

It's a Small Macworld†
"It's a new member of the Mac family," Jobs said. "It's really beautiful.... This is a very robust computer. But it's very, very tiny. The $500 model has a 1.25-GHz processor, 256 MB of RAM, a 40-GB hard drive and a combo drive. The model costing $100 more bumps up to a 1.42-GHz processor and an 80-GB hard drive. But the minis are CPUs only."
Story

( Permalink: It's a Small Macworld†      Submitted by Noel Wed Jan 12, 2005 )

Apple to make $499 Mac mini
"As had been rumored for days, Apple Computer Inc. today said it would begin selling a stripped-down Macintosh computer without monitor, keyboard or mouse for $499 and new iPod digital music players costing as little as $99."
Story

( Permalink: Apple to make $499 Mac mini      Submitted by Noel Wed Jan 12, 2005 )

Apple: Mac mini
"The modular design of Mac mini lets you upgrade your current system to the elegance, simplicity and reliability of Macintosh. If you already own a monitor, keyboard and mouse, you can get up and running in minutes. Or choose any combination of new devices to meet your individual situation. And yes, Mac mini will take advantage of your two-button USB mouse with scroll-wheel and your favorite USB keyboard. Just plug them in."
Story

( Permalink: Apple: Mac mini      Submitted by Noel Wed Jan 12, 2005 )

The longest short IP Sec Paper
"Recently it has come to my attention that I donít know as much about VPN as I wanted to know so I started to do research, I was able to find good material on almost every aspect of it except IPSEC. Most of the papers I found on it were either too long, or too short, or didnít go in detail enough or were written in about 150% English which made reading them so dry I had to have a high caffeine drink every 10-15 minutes. So I decided to write my own paper to assist other people in their studies of security and IPSec. Now I donít mean to be bashing anyoneís work or anything, and I am not saying that this one will be better, but I think there is room on the internet for another IPSec paper. I will try to keep this paper pretty short; I know how everyone hates long papers that seem to go on and on."
Story

( Permalink: The longest short IP Sec Paper      Submitted by Noel Wed Jan 12, 2005 )

Making the transition to 64 bits
As 64-bit PowerPC processors become more widely available, it becomes desirable to make applications run in the 64-bit computation mode, providing access to larger address space and faster 64-bit arithmetic. This excerpt from a longer Technical Library article covers some of the issues faced when porting existing 32-bit code to the new computing model -- or when embarking on new 64-bit development.

( Permalink: Making the transition to 64 bits      Submitted by Anonymous Wed Jan 12, 2005 )

The GNOME Journal, January Edition
The latest issue of The GNOME Journal has just been published. This regularly published online magazine features original content and commentary for and by the GNOME Community. This second issue covers some technical articles, including CD/DVD creation, connecting to remote resources, and how to get help from the GNOME community. Also, will GNOME pass the Liberal Arts major test?

Developer topics are also covered, as Seth Nickell takes at look at the "Experimental Culture" surrounding GNOME development and Christian Hammond sheds light on the concept of desktop presence.

( Permalink: The GNOME Journal, January Edition      Submitted by Ken VanDine Wed Jan 12, 2005 )

Students develop tsunami warning app
"Two students at the University of Technology in Sydney have developed a tsunami warning program which runs on the desktop of a Windows PC or a Mac. One of the students, Marcus Schappi, said he and colleague Christian Kent, had been inspired to create the little program after reading a column by well-known tech columnist Robert X. Cringely."
Story

( Permalink: Students develop tsunami warning app      Submitted by Noel Tue Jan 11, 2005 )

Fake Apple Box?
"Page links to images that claim to be of the new headless Apple machine. I don't believe it but its entertaining. "
Story

( Permalink: Fake Apple Box?      Submitted by Noel Tue Jan 11, 2005 )

FreeBSD System Disk Mirroring
"RAID-1 (mirroring) is a popular approach to protect the system from a harddisk failure. It is either done in hardware or software. The usual hardware solution is to buy a RAID disk controller like the popular 3ware ATA RAID controllers and then not having to deal with any software incompatibilities because the system just sees one large physical disk. The software solution is less expensive and more flexible, but usually makes more trouble during booting. Because an important point in establishing a software RAID-1 for the system disk partitions is whether one can directly boot from the resulting mirror setup without ugly BIOS and/or boot loader tricks. Additionally IMHO it is also important that in case of a major problem with the RAID-1 software driver, one is still able to easily rescue boot from the mirror setup by treating it like a plain disk setup again."
Story

( Permalink: FreeBSD System Disk Mirroring      Submitted by Noel Tue Jan 11, 2005 )

True Stories of Knoppix Rescues
"As a sysadmin, I wear many hats. Some days I'm the janitor--I clean up discarded files on the file server and clear spam from the mail server. Other days I'm the maintenance man--I make sure all the servers are running smoothly and that any holes have been patched. Some days I'm the architect--I plan, organize, and design systems to suit our needs. Some of my favorite days, however, are the days I put on my rescue hat. When a machine is in trouble, the whistle sounds, I grab my rescue gear, and I run down the beach with my life preserver. OK, well, I made that last part up; I'm not David Hasselhoff and this isn't Baywatch, but when it comes to system recovery, I choose the other thing Germans love--Knoppix."
Story

( Permalink: True Stories of Knoppix Rescues      Submitted by Noel Tue Jan 11, 2005 )

A guide to ripping and encoding music
"Audio formats are roughly divided into two groups: lossy and lossless. The words are relatively self-explanatory. Lossy formats are those codecs that approximate the audio you hear rather than actually storing the complete audio data. Lossless audio uses codecs that compress the audio without losing any quality. You might compare a lossless encode to a zip file: smaller than the original, but no data loss."
Story

( Permalink: A guide to ripping and encoding music      Submitted by Noel Tue Jan 11, 2005 )

How Security Exploits Threaten Governments
"In the day-to-day life of government information technology, procurement issues, vendor relations, support desk calls, system failures and lobbying command most decision makers' attention. The overall picture of keeping critical infrastructures safe rarely commands enough focus. Because of this, many officials have forgotten that a war exists, and technology infrastructures provide easy targets. Yet, if government officials recognized the magnitude of the problem, they could not avoid attending to it."
Story

( Permalink: How Security Exploits Threaten Governments      Submitted by Noel Tue Jan 11, 2005 )

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